• Get the person’s attention before you start speaking.
  • Maintain eye contact and watch the person’s body language and use of gesture.
  • Minimize or eliminate background noise (TV, radio, other people).
  • Keep your voice at a normal level. Do not speak loudly unless the person asks you to do so.
  • Keep communication simple, but adult. Don’t “talk down” to the person with aphasia.
  • Simplify your sentence structure and emphasize key words. 
  • Reduce your rate of speech.
  • Give the individual time to speak. Resist the urge to finish sentences or offer words.
  • Communicate with drawings, gestures, writing, and facial expressions in addition to speech.
  • Encourage the person to use drawings, gestures, and writing.
  • Use “yes” and “no” questions rather than open-ended questions.
  • Praise all attempts to speak and downplay any errors. Avoid insisting that that each word be produced perfectly.
  • Engage in normal activities whenever possible. 
  • Encourage independence and avoid being overprotective.